Treaty of Paris Period (1783-87): The Bridge Between the Revolution and the Constitution

The National CONTINENTAL CONGRESS Historical Society

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THE
Constitution

was not the
FIRST constitution......


Left: Commander-in-Chief Gen. George Washington resigning from the Army before President Thomas Mifflin and Congress in Annapolis, Dec. 23, 1783.

.....and there were 14 Presidents of Congress before George Washington!

Our efforts to promote "America's 14 Forgotten Presidents of Congress before George Washington"
as well as the Treaty of Paris Period (1783-87) were recently featured on

Baltimore's WBAL Chanel 11 on Presidents' Day, February 18, 2013.

Click on the image below to watch the video:
President John Hancock signed the                 President Samuel Huntington signed the        President Thomas MIfflin signed the Treaty
Declaration of Independence in 1776.                  Articles of Confederation and was President              of Paris Proclamation on Jan. 14, 1784.
                                                                             of Congress when they were ratified in 1781.
To see interactive portraits of all 14 Forgotten Presidents of Congress, click here.
The Main Street entrance to the Treaty of Paris Restaurant
The Crown and Crab Room (first room on the left)
The "America's 14 Forgotten Presidents of Congress
before George Washington" exhibit is
a FREE, daily,
self-guided, "walking tour" inside
the Maryland Inn's
CROWN AND CRAB ROOM,
16 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland 21401.


Visitors may enter when this room is not in use by the hotel*
Use the Main Street entrance for the Treaty of Paris Restaurant.

This is a great opportunity to learn a piece of history that is often missing from the story of America's creation. This exhibit is not so much a "museum" as it is a journey of re-discovery of a time when, prior to the Constitution, Congress had only one chamber which included a President elected from among its members.

*Daily schedule when this exhibit is open to the public as a free, self-guided tour:
Date:              Thursday through Monday, July 10-14
OPEN:             9:00am - 5:00pm
NOTE: There is a sandwich board on the sidewalk in front of the Main Street entrance to the Treaty of Paris Restaurant that has the exhibit's daily schedule written on it each morning.
In the Crown and Crab Room at the Maryland Inn is a display of exact replicas of documents signed by "America's 14 Forgotten Presidents of Congress" reproduced from originals owned by the families of Samuel J. Brown, Dr. Stephen D. Brown and George E. Brown. The exhibit features 14 individually framed presidential "collections" that include a color portrait of a President of Congress, a document signed by him, his bio and a summary of what is taking place in the document. The unicameral version of Congress had their own Presidents, from the first Continental Congress in 1774 to the last legislative session before the Constitution went into effect in 1789. The original documents were the featured exhibit at the Second National Continental Congress Festival, held last September 11-14, 2013 at the Annapolis Masonic Lodge.

The 14 framed presidential "collections" (plus one representing George Washington, for chronological and historical context) ring the Crown and Crab room and make for an excellent visit while touring Annapolis. Learn when each President of Congress served, what city they served and the major events during their terms that influenced American history, including the Treaty of Paris Period (1783-87) when the Treaty of Paris was signed and ratified and the Articles of Confederation were openly critiqued and ultimately replaced. We invite you to see how Annapolis played a key role during this period by viewing this exhibit and the other document replicas inside the Treaty of Paris Restaurant.

The Crown and Crab Room is located on the first level of the Maryland Inn, the first room on the left as you enter from Main Street, next to the Drummer's Lot Pub. To determine if the Crown and Crab room is open to the public on any given day,  consult the "Daily Schedule" above.


To view the virtual collection

of the Brown family's documents,
click here.
 
To compare the quality of the Brown family's collection to an alternative set of signed documents by the 14 Presidents of Congress, click here
Contact Mark Croatti for a GUIDED TOUR of this exhibit.

Mark Croatti is available to come and speak to your class, school, college or community about "The Treaty of Paris Period (1783-87)" or provide for any size group (even 2 or 3 people) a walking tour covering these Annapolis-based events:

* 1783: George Washington's resignation from the Army.
* 1783-84
: The process of signing and ratifying the Treaty of Paris and the appointment of Thomas Jefferson to France during the time when Annapolis was the nation's capital.
* 1785-87: How the Mount Vernon Compact between Maryland and Virginia led to the 1786 Annapolis Convention and how that event, along with Shays' Rebellion, led to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.


Rates
To come speak: Negotiable.
Walking tours: Individuals: $10 each / Under 18: $8 each / Group of 10: $80 / Group of 15: $100 / Group of 20 or more: $120.

To book Mark Croatti to speak or provide a walking tour, email: mark.annapolisccs@gmail.com